The Maine Wolf Coalition, Inc.

Canadian Wildlife Biologist Sophie Czetwertynski holding radio-collared wolf pups in Quebec’s Laurentide Reserve.   The Reserve may serve as a source population for wolves in the northeast U.S. if they are allowed to survive and disperse.
In August 1993 a bear hunter from Pennsylvania shot and killed a young female wolf as she came in to feed on bear bait in the north Maine woods.  The killing of this animal demonstrated the very real possibility that wolves are attempting to recolonize the northeast U.S. after an apparent absence of nearly a century. 

The Maine Wolf Coalition was founded in 1994 to support wolf recovery in Maine through research, education and protection.  Through this website we are seeking to educate the public, wildlife professionals and government officials by gathering and disseminating evidence that natural wolf recovery in the northeast is not only possible, but that it will happen if we only let the wolves survive.

Photo Left: Canadian Wildlife Biologist Sophie Czetwertynski holding radio-collared wolf pups in Quebec’s Laurentide Reserve. The Reserve may serve as a source population for wolves in the northeast U.S. if they are allowed to survive and disperse.

 

Coywolves

Maine has no coyotes (Canis latrans).  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_coyote

The wolflike canid that ranges from Ohio to the Carolinas and northeast to Newfoundland and Labrador is not a coyote, but a hybrid of the coyote, wolf and domestic dog.  The animal that we call coyote is more aptly named “coywolf”.  Coywolves were first documented in Canada in the early 20th century and by the 1930’s they had reached Maine.  The L.C. Bates Museum in Hinckley contains a strange looking specimen purported to be a wolf killed in Calais, Maine around 1910.  It looks nothing like the coy wolves of today.   Read the rest of this entry »

New Facebook Page About Maine Wildlife

I have started a new Facebook page titled John Glowa’s Maine Fish and Wildlife News.  The purpose of the new page is to educate the people of Maine about what really is going on when it comes to the public’s fish and wildlife resources. There are many issues that the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, radical “sportsmen”, and their allies in the press don’t want the public to know about. For example, they don’t want the public to know the truth about Maine’s misnamed Coyote Control Program and the tens of thousands of dollars that are being wasted annually with no scientifically documented benefit to Maine’s deer herd. Another issue they don’t want the public to know about is the growing number of bald eagle deaths in Maine, the potential health threat to humans resulting from the consumption of lead fragments in wild game, and Maine’s state government run Hunters for the Hungry program program that distributes wild meat to the public without x-raying it for lead fragments and without warning the public regarding the dangers of consuming lead tainted meat. Read the rest of this entry »

MWC requests U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service not approve Maine’s 2015 State Wildlife Action Plan until it includes the Gray Wolf

On January 14, 2016, the Maine Dept. of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife submitted its 2015 Revision of the State Wildlife Action Plan to the USFWS for review and approval. The revision contained no mention of the gray wolf. MWC’s written comments to MDIFW received no substantive response. In response, the Maine Wolf Coalition has submitted a formal request to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that the service not approve Maine’s proposed 2015 Wildlife Action Plan until it includes the gray wolf. MWC also recently asked the MDIFW Commissioner’s Advisory Council to recommend to the department that it revise the proposed plan to include the gray wolf. Read the rest of this entry »