The Maine Wolf Coalition, Inc.

Canadian Wildlife Biologist Sophie Czetwertynski holding radio-collared wolf pups in Quebec’s Laurentide Reserve.   The Reserve may serve as a source population for wolves in the northeast U.S. if they are allowed to survive and disperse.
In August 1993 a bear hunter from Pennsylvania shot and killed a young female wolf as she came in to feed on bear bait in the north Maine woods.  The killing of this animal demonstrated the very real possibility that wolves are attempting to recolonize the northeast U.S. after an apparent absence of nearly a century. 

The Maine Wolf Coalition was founded in 1994 to support wolf recovery in Maine through research, education and protection.  Through this website we are seeking to educate the public, wildlife professionals and government officials by gathering and disseminating evidence that natural wolf recovery in the northeast is not only possible, but that it will happen if we only let the wolves survive.

Photo Left: Canadian Wildlife Biologist Sophie Czetwertynski holding radio-collared wolf pups in Quebec’s Laurentide Reserve. The Reserve may serve as a source population for wolves in the northeast U.S. if they are allowed to survive and disperse.

 

Transitions

We started the Maine Wolf Coalition in September 1994 at Maine’s Common Ground Fair. We knew that Maine needed an organization to speak out on behalf of wolves and to educate the public about them. For a number of years we were membership based and very active giving presentations, attending functions, and raising monies to support our work. Over time, as people came and went, and as it became more practical to do so, we made the decision to become an internet based organization instead of a membership based organization. For several years now we have operated MWC on a shoestring with the bulk of our funds used to pay for our website. With very limited monies and resources, through our website, our wolf booth and in response to inquiries from the public and the press we have continued to educate others about wolves and to serve as a major voice in wolf recovery advocacy. Read the rest of this entry »

U.S. Fish Wildlife Service Plan to De-list Wolves Runs Into a Stumbling Block

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to de-list the gray wolf from most of the continental United States has run into a stumbling block.  An independent scientific review panel unanimously concluded that the proposal to de-list gray wolves in the northeast based upon the Service’s conclusion that the eastern wolf, not the gray wolf is native to the northeast, is not based on the best available science and is not supported by sufficient scientific evidence.  MWC had earlier testified to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that there is insufficient evidence that gray wolves are not native to the northeast and much evidence (prey species, proximity to existing/former gray wolf populations, etc.) that gray wolves are native to this region. Read the rest of this entry »

Why Isn’t the USFWS Looking for Wolves in the Northeast?

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s response to a recent Freedom of Information Act request submitted by MWC was very enlightening, more for what it didn’t contain than for what it did. Based upon the lack of information in the response, we now know that the Service is not proactively looking for wolves in the northeast. Read the rest of this entry »